Disclosing Detailed Information about New Cigarettes

Published on October 14th, 2011 00:00

According to the 2009 law, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has the right to control tobacco companies and require them to disclose detailed information about new smoking products they launch and changes they make the existing ones.

This authority will for the first time inform government agency about every change made by a particular tobacco company and will also allow to prevent tobacco companies from making their smokes even more harmful, addictive and appealing to minors.

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The 2009 law call all tobacco companies to present detailed information to the FDA before launching something new. Before companies introduce these products on the market, the FDA should find either that they are equivalent to those products that were on the cigarette market on or before February 15, 2007, or that their introduction is convenient for the production of the public health.

Recently, the FDA presented a draft guidance concerning the data tobacco companies should reveal about new cigarettes that are not substantially equivalent to those already sold on the market. Before, the FDA issued a guidance on the process for a tobacco company declaring that a changed product is “substantially equivalent” to an existing product. According to the law, the draft guidance monitoring new smoking products requires the cigarette companies to disclose all information about the ingredients, flavorings, properties of the products; and complete description of production and processing methods. It is essential that the FDA be watchful and guarantee that tobacco companies do not evade these requirements by demanding that every new smoking product or change is substantially equivalent to existing products.

Until present, tobacco companies have been able to secretly alter their products and no government authority has had the power to do anything about it. Currently, for the first time, tobacco companies will have to disclose all changes to the FDA, and in its turn the FDA has the power to stop product changes that affect public health, including such changes that make it more complicated for present smokers to quit their habit or easier for new consumers to start. Under the bright spotlight of FDA investigation, tobacco companies will no longer be able to surreptitiously influence their products in ways that make them more addictive.

This new requirement is an essential complement to other critical regulations of the new law. The present law also calls tobacco manufacturers to reveal detailed information about all tobacco products, including all ingredients and flavorings by brand and statistics of the effects of the products. The FDA also has the power to demand changes in all tobacco products — both existing and newly created in order to protect public health.

By Kevin Lawson, Staff Writer. Copyright © 2011 TobaccoPub.com. All rights reserved.

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